Entries tagged "HTML forms"

Improve Email Validation in Qualtrics Forms

I received a Qualtrics form submission where the email field, which is supposed to be required, was left blank. The customer then forwarded me the address she tried and said the form kept saying it was invalid. Since the address she sent was indeed valid, I needed to look into what was potentially causing the error. I also needed to determine how the form was submitted without an email address. [Continue reading]

Lessons Learned: Working with Event Registrations in Qualtrics

Qualtrics works well for collecting event registrations. But there are a number of things to be aware of. I imagine that the "issues" stem from the service being geared towards administering surveys online. However, the benefits of using Qualtrics outweigh the shortcomings. [Continue reading]

Lessons Learned: Live2Lead Website and Using Qualtrics for Collecting Event Registrations

For the new websites I create, my goal has been to make them responsive. That way I get some practice before committing to an overhaul of a major website. The extra practice should make the redesign process go smoother since hopefully I'll have the experience to solve whatever problems I come across. With the latest website, I was given the opportunity to further enhance my skills. Plus, I found a new, and somewhat unusual, solution for collecting event registrations. [Continue reading]

How to Test Form Submissions: Using Google Chrome to Change Form Values

When forms are set to the POST method, it may not be apparent how you can test responses made through fields like radio buttons. Of course, you can click each radio button to make sure each individual value can be submitted. But how do you make sure that someone can't tamper with the form and submit an invalid value. Let's take a look at how the browser can help. [Continue reading]

How to Test Submissions from Forms that Use the POST Method

An important part of developing online forms is testing. One area of testing I've always wanted to better with is making sure input types like radio buttons can't accept values which are not allowed. In this week's post, we go over my primary method of testing. That way we can discuss a faster way next time. [Continue reading]

Disable the Maxlength Attribute on Any HTML Form Field

HTML forms have a feature for limiting the amount of characters someone can enter into a field. While this feature can be useful, be aware that it is easy for the limitation to be bypassed. Let's take a quick look at one bypass method. [Continue reading]

Easy Way to Un-hide Passwords in the Log-in Forms You Use Everyday

Entering passwords into online forms can be challenging. Especially since most (if not all) log-in forms obscure the characters entered for the password. Don't get me wrong; I appreciate that passwords are being hidden. I just wish it was easier to un-hide them. Well, it turns out that there is a relatively quick way to view a password in browsers like Google Chrome. [Continue reading]

Check Array and Object Values in JavaScript with console.dir()

The alert() method in JavaScript is useful for quickly seeing what a variable contains as the program executes, but it has some limitations. It won't display the values stored in an array without creating a loop, for example. If you do create a loop, alert boxes can be aggravating since they each need to be confirmed separately. Luckily, there is another JavaScript method. [Continue reading]

Make Sure Things Are Working Correctly in JavaScript with the alert() Method

My usage of JavaScript can be a bit sporadic. There are times when I go months without writing a line of JavaScript code. So I find myself forgetting how to do certain things. It also doesn't help that most of my time is spent with PHP which adds to the confusion since the languages have different aspects to them. To help get my bearings, I've used JavaScript's alert() method to quickly see things like what value a variable contains. Let's look at a simplified example showing how I use alert(). [Continue reading]

Alternate Way for Adding Labels to Online Forms

To make HTML forms more accessible to those using assistive technology like screen readers, we need to use <label> tags to associate the field labels with the corresponding fields. It wasn't until recently that I realized you don't always need to add an id attribute to field that you're attaching the label to. There is another way and it requires less typing. [Continue reading]